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Discussion Starter #1
im not very familiar with the p7 at all, i never held one, only seen in pics, and i think it looks goofy as hell, and thats half the reason why i want it. the other half is its an HK, and i guess a somewhat collectable gun, and that intrigues me. and im looking for a 9mm..

i see alot for sale going for well over 1000-1600 bucks. im not in a rush to buy one, id love to look for a good deal on one. i seen on an advertising add on this site, for a nickel plated one for i think it was 800? and i think they are new? i thought they only came blue. i gave my self a flash course on the guns, i know a few things about all the variants.. but id like some more help looking to getting one. im in CA and i know thats a bit tougher on me. id really prefer not to have a refinished gun. i like the look of the plum colored slide, is that a factory finish? or a refinish or what? whats the story on that.

thanks friends!
 

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The one you see advertised by another company is a PSP, not a P7M8. Something to keep in mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
its still a p7 isnt it? if were the earliest wouldnt it say PSP on the side, along with no grip markings. id be fine with a p7 or psp. its still the same gun basicly. but not fan of the nickel.
 

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look at the sides of the cocker for finish wear to get some idea of how many times it has been shot/handled, also function test it for grittiness; Look at the feed ramp for finish wear; Check the piston for damage and wear; look at the muzzle crown for damage, and inspect the barrel for the same. Check the magazine feed lips.follower and spring. Assume any refinished gun was refinished cause it was beat to heck. The finest guns were have a Chantilly import stamp. Finally, finding original grease on the gun is usually a good sign too.
 

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The main differences between the P7 or P7 PSP and the P7M8 are that the M8's have the "American" mag release under the trigger guard whereas the P7 PSP uses the "European" mag release on the heel of the frame and the P7M8's have a "heat shield" above the trigger guard (these guns tend to get pretty hot if you fire many rounds in a short period of time). One of the best indications of whether or not the gun has seen better days is by looking at the piston -- the edges should be sharp and not filled with gunk. If the piston looks worn, it's a sign of a worn pistol. If it is caked in muck, it's the sign of a gun that has not been well cared for. The P7s you saw advertised were all police trade-ins (from the German Police, I believe). They were checked out by HK and then sold as used (Grade A, B and C -- with Grade A being the best). Some of these trade-ins were refinished after they left HK (like the nickel one you reference). Some of the trade-ins have a mill mark on the side of the slide where a Police Unit insignia has been removed. Personally, as you can see from my sig, I am a huge fan of the P7's. Everyone that I have had try a P7 has loved it. Since it is a fixed barrel, blow back gun, it tends to be extremely accurate and the gas piston system really reduces recoil significantly. The major downside to the P7 is that they are no longer in production, so parts and repair may become an issue. Good luck in your search!
 

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its still a p7 isnt it? if were the earliest wouldnt it say PSP on the side, along with no grip markings. id be fine with a p7 or psp. its still the same gun basicly. but not fan of the nickel.
Yes, but a Chevette and a Corvette are both "Vette's" from Chevrolet yet each is worth a vastly different amount.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
i know the link... thats how i know what i do. im wondering what a good deal would be for one, weather its a p7 psp or p7m8. and i wanna know the story behind the purple slide
 

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Here are some things you want to look for in a used P7...

The P7 should cycle smoothly by hand. Any roughness or binding in manual cycling of the slide usually clearly indicates a fouled gas tube in need of scraping/cleaning or to a much less likely extent a bent gas piston.

Operation-


* Upon depressing the cocking lever, the striker/FP should protrude from the rear through the FP bushing. Once the pistol is dry fired, the striker should fall, and upon recycling the slide with the trigger held to the rear the striker/FP should recock itself and then the trigger can be released until reset.


Remove the slide.


* Look at the gas piston. The edges of the gas rings should be somewhat sharp. Dulled gas piston rings may cause the gas system to not seal properly. Also, as mentioned above, be certain the piston is straight.

* The gas piston itself should never be scraped or cleaned with a metal brush or other metal instrument as this can cause the rings to dull. In addition, extensive use of un-jacketed (lead) bullets can also cause clogging of the gas system with molten lead. Use only jacketed rounds.

* Some P7 trade in's have even had brand new gas pistons put into them when HK received them for grading, although generally speaking no other parts replacements are performed on these pistols.

* Check to make sure the drop safety catch and spring are present and in their proper location in the slide.
* Check the welds on the inside of the slide for cracks.

Remove the firing pin bushing

* On P7 (PSP type) this will require a takedown tool.

* Look for cracks or breakage of any kind on the bushing itself.
 
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