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I'm looking to buy a PSG-1 but want to make sure it will be legal to own by civilian. What is the last year(date code) of manufacture I can buy and stay legal?...........thanks,
 

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I'm looking to buy a PSG-1 but want to make sure it will be legal to own by civilian. What is the last year(date code) of manufacture I can buy and stay legal?...........thanks,
You can find that info here on HK Pro: The Symbols on HK Firearms

I hope the gun you were offered wasn't a "45" prefix, I've seen an illegal gun offered that way from someone who does not have the legal right to possess guns any more.
 

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Technically speaking you can legally own a BA (2010) date code although they are few and very far between.

Get a good 44prefix (PSG1 and not a 45-MSG90) and be done. Also, make sure you get a case with it. They are cheap right now so take advantage while you can. Although everyone needs atleast 2.
 

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Technically speaking you can legally own a BA (2010) date code although they are few and very far between.

Get a good 44prefix (PSG1 and not a 45-MSG90) and be done. Also, make sure you get a case with it. They are cheap right now so take advantage while you can. Although everyone needs atleast 2.
Cheap? I just saw one for $15,000 on GB. Ouch. Also, how the world are people gettin MSG-90's? They have front push pin holes.
 

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Compared to 20K for a NIB in 07 they are cheap now.

I do not know the details on the mSG90s, apparently somrone tried to sell one as a PSG1.
 

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Compared to 20K for a NIB in 07 they are cheap now.

I do not know the details on the mSG90s, apparently somrone tried to sell one as a PSG1.
Oh wow. I had no idea. Why anyone would want an automatic sniper rifle I'm not sure but you know how ATF feels about a pin hole.
 

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The pin hole refers to the hole at the back of the mag well and at the front of the trigger group, where the two meet and are connected by a push pin. The ATF defines that hole as making a weapon a machine gun. On the civilian legal G3 based weapons, like the HK91, 93, 94, and SP89, there is no hole in that position, instead there is a shelf, sometimes referred to as the semi-auto shelf. That shelf prevents someone from mounting a full auto trigger group. It also negates the need for that push pin.
Hope that clears it up.
 

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Can you tell me what a pin hole is?
Why is it good/bad?
Also an answer available here on HK Pro: The Complete Reference on the Legal NFA Conversion of HK Firearms - The Reciever: Where it all Begins

On most factory original machine-gun versions the fire-control group is mounted by, and pivots on in the front, a horizontally sliding assembly pin front and rear. (Some notable factory original exceptions to this trigger group mounting rule are machine guns such as the HK21E and G41, which for specific and intended design purposes, are equipped with a non-pivot pin type front trigger group attaching mount. A contrary exception to the general rule is the MSG90 Selected Marksmans’ Rifle; though the MSG90 is intended as a semi-automatic weapon it is designed with a front pivot-pin mounting attachment for the semi-automatic fire control group, and as such, BATF has classified this particular weapon as being legally classed as a “Machine Gun” even though it is incapable of automatic fire in its’ intended form.) This front assembly/pivot pin is aligned and held by a set of indexed holes located on a rounded protrusion of the receiver bottom at the rear of the magazine housing upper area. It is mated with a permanently affixed (usually welded, though press fitting is sometimes used) fitted bushing on the inside of the two pressed steel sides of the receiver stamping for the assembly/pivot pin to pass through and bear against. By this method the trigger housing can be held fast in the proper position on the receiver, and also pivot downward for disassembly or cleaning. This is arrangement is commonly known as the “push-pin trigger group assembly”, or “swing-down trigger housing” type. It is the original and most common method of attachment of the trigger housing on factory machine-guns. This feature alone, the holes and mated bushing for the front assembly/pivot pin, has been determined to be the sole defining feature by BATF Technology Branch as to what constitutes in a legally defining sense a “Machine Gun” receiver for a H&K type weapon under the National Firearms Act.
 
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