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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Since I like interesting stuff I ended up with a P7M8, bought sight-unseen, and it's a pistol type that I never fired before.

First off, it's surprisingly heavy for its size. But my real question is: how many pounds of force should I expect it to take to pull the slide back? I know all about its gas cylinder and the need to keep it clean, but this one arrived in very good condition and the rack moves very smoothly. But geeeeezus, it's way harder to pull back than the slide of a 9mm 1911. Or maybe I'm just a girly-man.

Regardless of whether it's clean or not, I'd like to have a rough idea of what effort (in pounds to be objective) it's supposed to take. Help this whimpy guy out.

Thanks!
 

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As much as it needs to feed the chamber with a round. It is a great pistol you have there. Being a proud owner of several of his type of weapon, I think it second to none. When you shoot this weapon, you are going to be very impressed with he accuracy and the ease of function. You may even become a great fan such as myself where you may acquire a few more specimen for your collection. I had 11 in my collection all different of course and several of each models. Now I had to down size for funds and own 5. I sold 3 just to one guy. I am not happy right now but at least I still own a few.
 

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First, don't post things about yourself being whimpy.-lol
Second, just work with it for 3-4 nights in a row and it won't be an issue.
Third, get a .45 1911...
 

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Or buy a HK45 and have a 45 that works every time with every ammo and holds more rounds. :wink:
I like your style Chad! Lol


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah yeah, very funny.

First off though, how can it "loosen up" any further if it's already a 10-20 years pistol with presumably many shots through it?

Second, I do have .45s, so you guys can just bite me! :wink: AND they're easier to rack than the P7M8, hence me asking for the actual force needed.
 

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Yeah yeah, very funny.

First off though, how can it "loosen up" any further if it's already a 10-20 years pistol with presumably many shots through it?

Second, I do have .45s, so you guys can just bite me! :wink: AND they're easier to rack than the P7M8, hence me asking for the actual force needed.
KB:

With modern high performance bullets available today .45's are not what they used to be especially when one considers the low mag capacity, larger size and recoil, etc associated with a .45 over a 9mm. In fact some of the better bonded 9mm rounds now perform as well or better than those in .40 S&W and some large agencies like the FBI are questioning their move to .40 cals due to recoil and handing issues. Many females and weaker males have a hard time with handling the extra recoil. The guys that offed OBL still primarily use 9mm's though some .45's were fielded for suppressed use.

The slide force on the P7M8 as I recall was 18-20 or 22 lbs. The design needs that to keep the slide fully closed during the initial stages of cartridge ignition because it is a straight unlocked blow-back action until the gas system is "energized". If you lessen the weight of the spring you can affect the safe and reliable operation of the pistol. I would not. If the slide force req'd to retract the slide seems to have increased you might try cleaning the gas cylinder more often and leaving a bit of light (VERY LIGHT) lube on the piston. Some types of ammo impart more fouling and grit into the gas system then others making the slide "feel" harder to retract and the sound rougher. When all is well in the cylinder the slide moves freely with a slick not gritty feel.

Also work on your manner of slide retraction. Keep the pistol in close to your body with the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. That helps make the best use of available hand strength.

The slide pull and small concealed slide lock tab are two reasons why the P7 is not the best choice for all persons. You MUST be able to retract, hold and engage the slide lock at all times even when your hands are wet, oily or just not strong in order to be fully competent and safe with the P7. Not all are and those should not carry the P7.

It is a great gun but very specialized and not the best choice for many. Learn to shoot it well and the .45 guys will be jealous. Few guns in any caliber can outshoot a stock P7 in the right hands. Hits count - near misses don't.

G3Kurz
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the info, G3. I'll be taking it to the range on Friday to try it out, it certainly is an interesting design. We have an informal (shoot what you brought) steel shoot each month and the P7M8 seems like a natural. The rules are six shots fired per mag, three mags per stage. Then there's about 30 minutes downtime between stages so there won't be any issues with the pistol getting hot or me running out of mags. Looking forward to it and thanks again!
 

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The slide can, indeed, be a bear to pull back at times when simply racking in a round. I still have to have a very particular grip in order to lock the slide back without the magazine (as a matter of fact, my wife didn't even know you could lock the slide back without a mag but after I showed her how, there was no way she would be able to do it on her own). As funky as the M8 can be with it's various idiosyncrasies, my opinion is that it is well worth the trouble. Enjoy your new shooter!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah up until handling it I thought that it might be a decent "just in case" pistol for the wife. I think it still can be, but I'd have to rack the slide for her. I should also show her how she can rack it (in an emergency) by pressing the slide against something, like the edge of a table.
 

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my lady is by definition a Girly Girl. she has absolutely no problem pulling back the slide, and even locking it. only thing is she needs to remember which way bullets fit in a mag, and which way the mag faces when inserting in the gun.. :-\
 

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I thought the P7M8 would be a perfect pistol for my wife to shoot because she is left handed. No safety lever, decocker to try to reach. But it was too difficult for her to rack the slide, let alone lock it back. Mine has the grind mark on the slide. I've always wanted to get it refinished, but am afraid chrome or NP3 would be slippery and make it even harder to operate.

Rake
 

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I thought the P7M8 would be a perfect pistol for my wife to shoot because she is left handed. No safety lever, decocker to try to reach. But it was too difficult for her to rack the slide, let alone lock it back. Mine has the grind mark on the slide. I've always wanted to get it refinished, but am afraid chrome or NP3 would be slippery and make it even harder to operate.

Rake
Slide retraction, grip size and trigger pull are the first things I look for when setting up new students/users with handguns, females or small and or weak-handed males. If they cannot easily master these three things I direct them elsewhere. @ 60% of the females and maybe 35% males cannot properly and repeatedly (and safely) retract and lock the slide rearward on the P7 due to lack of hand strength. It only gets worse when they get nervous, sweaty, tired or all of the above. A brand new female student insisted on buying a NIB P7M8 for $1800 because she just had to have it based on the praise of other P7 users. I doubt she ever was able to lock the slide back.
The P7 always was and still is a specialist's pistol.
G3Kurz
 

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I love my P7 pistols. I don't think there ever was a weapon made that tops it in any way. Hell after it warms up you can even place a cheese sandwich and make a grilled cheese sandwich. Jokes aside, I do have to say it is by far I shoot this pistol the best out of any of my weapons. It feels great in the hand and the control and function is right at point of aim. LOVE IT! Hey if you cannot rack the slide then it might be a good idea to invite a big fan of the P7 like myself to the range and I can show you how it works properly.😊
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I disassembled and cleaned it (still haven't made it to the range yet.) One thing I've discovered is that the slide retaining button is very sensitive. I try to engage it and it'll either fail to hold outright, or will hold but will release after about 5-10 seconds even when not touched. I assume that the slide latch must be worn and that this is all that's needed, HK P7 Slide Removal Button or Retaining Catch - HKPARTS.NET

Is this a fairly common issue? Does it always have to be fixed by replacement or is it a matter of a burr that needs to be knocked down? (I haven't fully disassembled it to find out.)
 
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